Parental Advocacy: a FREE webinar

By Richard Devine, Social Worker for Bath and North East Somerset Council and Tim Fisher, Service Manager for Camden Council

Parental Advocacy is picking up momentum as an effective, ethically sound approach to supporting children and families, underpinned by an increasing evidence base. The Independent Review of Children’s Social Care Case for Change identify it as a promising approach to avoiding court proceedings, noting “the potential of parent advocacy and co-production in child protection to reduce adversarial practice and avoid unnecessary escalation.” (MacAlister, 2021, p47).

In this webinar, Tim Fisher and I explore the following:

  • What is Parental Advocacy?
  • What are the benefits?
  • What are the challenges?
  • What does the research say (and what are the limitations of the research)?
  • How can you make a start?
  • What does it look like in a Local Authority?
Click on the link HERE to be taken directly to relational activisms website where you can access the webinar

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I intend to write every fortnight about matters related to child protection, children and families, attachment, and trauma.  Or you can read previous blogs here.

Published by Richard Devine's Social Work Practice Blog

My name is Richard Devine. I am a Social Worker in Bath and North East Somerset Council. After I qualified in 2010 I worked in long term Child Protection Teams. Since 2017 I have been undertaking community based parenting assessments. I obtained a Masters in Attachment Studies 2018.

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